Drawing in colour! Students at work...

The endless variety of colours and unique shapes to play with make food the perfect subject to draw and paint. The rich dark of the aubergine below, offset against the mid toned background, looks almost like velvet. The brightness of the lemon adds extra zing! 

Julie's students.jpg

 Here, students Felicity and Anne are getting to grips with chalk pastels, layering the colour bravely and building up tones in layers. For their first time using chalks, they did a brilliant job.

JulieDouglasStudent.jpg

 Chalk pastel and coloured pencil are both delicious ways to aid observation of colours. Their dry pigment allows you to go straight to the paper and begin noticing how colours interact when mixed together. Working on coloured paper gives for different colour relationships too. 

Felicity&Ann.jpg
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Portrait in oils, a workshop with Cesar Santos, Florence

Attending masterclasses is a valuable experience which can shift understanding or expand on existing knowledge. For those of us who teach much of the time, it also provides the opportunity to paint without the distraction of other commitments.

My painting by the end of the workshop. 

My painting by the end of the workshop. 

I spent a few days in Florence last week, on a workshop given by Cesar Santos, hosted in the very lovely surroundings of The Florence Studio, owned by Laura Thompson and Frank Rekrut. A spacious, bright and clean environment, I have never felt so welcomed and well cared for in any other studio. The fridge was stocked with bottled water for the students, and nibbles on the table.

Most of the students, with Cesar, at the end of the week. 

Most of the students, with Cesar, at the end of the week. 

Cesar is incredibly knowledgable, polite and keen to share his skills.  I was delighted, of course, that his main message was about drawing, and he took us through all the stages, from simplifying the head, to getting it onto canvas, under painting, 1st and 2nd painting.

First morning, my drawing, simplifying the form and getting to 'know' the model. 

First morning, my drawing, simplifying the form and getting to 'know' the model. 

Later day 1, the drawing completed directly on the canvas. 

Later day 1, the drawing completed directly on the canvas. 

Day 2, the under painting - this layer is to establich tones, not colours. 

Day 2, the under painting - this layer is to establich tones, not colours. 

Cesar's palette

Cesar's palette

The '1st painting, day 3, to opaquely apply colour using broad strokes and the biggest brush we could bear... 

The '1st painting, day 3, to opaquely apply colour using broad strokes and the biggest brush we could bear... 

One of Cesar's demonstrations. 

One of Cesar's demonstrations. 

More of the 1st Stage. 

More of the 1st Stage. 

I met lots of lovely people, and one evening we enjoyed a tour round The Pettit Palace with Cesar as our guide.

Cesar guiding us through the Pitti Palce examining old master paintings. 

Cesar guiding us through the Pitti Palce examining old master paintings. 

Day 4, more of the 1st Painting, with some 2nd Painting (a thinly applied layer) as well. 

Day 4, more of the 1st Painting, with some 2nd Painting (a thinly applied layer) as well. 

Here are some quotes from Cesar, taken from my notes:

‘Drawing is our attempt to understand.’

‘Painting is meaningless without drawing’.

‘Drawing has nothing to do with the materials: it is the eye. Students must strive to make the drawing excellent, try to achieve perfection, in every drawing. Keep perfecting. 100 bad drawings won’t give you a good one! Just as a poet needs to learn grammar in order to express bigger things, in art, excel in drawing first.’

Frank and Maurice in the studio. 

Frank and Maurice in the studio. 

A bit of fun at the end of the week - Cesar Santos, framed!

A bit of fun at the end of the week - Cesar Santos, framed!

Cheers! 

Cheers! 

For information on my workshops in Belfast, email julie@juliedouglas.co.uk

next up: Workshops in Oils, portrait, water colour and a drawing and painting session for children.

Portrait in oil, stages of the process

‘Process’ is the path from the humble beginnings (possibly an idea or a thought) to a more finished end. If I had my way, art exhibitions would include not only a display of the ‘finished’ works but also much of the preparation work it took to get to there. I think this would not only enlighten people to the effort involved, but it would help them appreciate the steps required and stall the race-to-the-end which seems to be urgently demanded. There are well-trodden stages to finished artworks, and much joy to be had in lingering there. It’s not ALL about the end.

I am currently working on a small painting of my son. I love sharing the whole process involved in producing artwork, so here is the initial drawing in stages, and the colour study which I did before starting the more careful final painting.

I don’t absolutely always do a preliminary drawing - but I am always sorry if I haven’t. The drawing study is a valuable way to investigate shapes and tones and placement of the elements to be painted, as well as the place to make decisions about the atmosphere we want to achieve in the final work . Spending time preparing to paint repays tenfold, or more!

Drawing4.jpg

The next stage is the colour study. I LOVE this part! In fact, my study has more detail in than is necessary, but I was enjoying it and indulged myself. Working straight to paint, I blocked in a face-shape, without worrying at all about a likeness. The point here is working out what colours, and paying attention to tonal balance too. In this painting, there is a lot of striped light on the forehead from lighting directly above. That is the challenge.

The photo above is to show you the scale - it isn't large. It took an evening to complete. 

Now I’m ready to begin the final painting!

For info on upcoming workshops please email me on julie@juliedouglas.co.uk

Little Italy in Belfast - Masterclasses with Michael John Angel and Jered Woznicki 2017

I am delighted to confirm two masterclasses for August 2017 in Belfast by two world renowned painters, maestro Michael John Angel, and Jered Woznicki, traveling from Florence.

Maestro giving demonstration, Belfast

Maestro giving demonstration, Belfast

The Angel Academy of Art in Florence is dedicated to the persuit of excellence in painting. Over the past couple of years I have been priviledged to become friends with maestro Michael John Angel, founder of the Angel Academy. Not only is he one of the most knowledgeable people I have ever met, he is also a fantastic teacher who is passionate about sharing his knowledge and committed to ensuring that standards remain high.

He came to Belfast to deliver a workshop in 2016 and it was so successful that he asked to come back again! His 2017 workshop will be on painting using the methods of Bouguereau - August 18th - 22nd.

Student painting.

Student painting.

This year his workshop is being followed by a second masterclass delivered by Jered Woznicki, a senior instructor at The Angel Academy. Jered is renowned for his tuition in colour mixing, he is exacting and thorough and has been described by past students as 'a full on fountain of knowledge'. Students practice each stage of the process several times and all students get individual feedback several times a day.  His workshop will be Painting the Figure from Photographs, August 24th - 28th.

Pat, Brian and Pauline during Maestro's 2016 workshop in Belfast

Pat, Brian and Pauline during Maestro's 2016 workshop in Belfast

Belfast is not as hot as Florence in August! The venue is Crescent Arts Centre, which is located in Queen's Quarter near hotels and restaurants.

For details, description and information on Michael John Angel's workshop please click here

For details on Jered Woznicki's workshop please click here

For general information email julie@juliedouglas.co.uk

Jered Woznicki Masterclass Belfast 2017

Painting the Figure from Photographs. Thursday 24th - Monday 28th August 2017

Jered Woznicki, Senior Painting and Drawing Instructor at the Angel Academy of Art in Florence, Italy is coming to Belfast in August 2017 to deliver a detailed workshop on Painting the Figure from Photographs.

Painting by Jered Woznicki

Painting by Jered Woznicki

This training seminar is a condensed version of the two-year course that Mr Woznicki teaches in Italy on Painting from the Live Model. The same classic procedure will be used and the same realistic flesh-colours will be employed during this workshop. Everyone will learn how to balance a flesh-coloured complexion in order to make their figures seem more believable and lifelike.   

Topics included in this course are: gesture, construct, articulation, the block-in of the colours, the essential balance of flesh-colours through different values, requisite planes and the finishing of the painting. Special attention will be paid to the layout, function and use of the figure-painting palette. 

Mr Woznicki will demonstrate the use of the figure-painting palette and will advise every student, individually, on how to best employ these lessons to improve their figure paintings.   

This course will provide a structure and methodology in traditional figure painting, suitable for both beginning and experienced realist artists.  Mr Woznicki is renowned for the excellence of his workshops, and early booking is recommended. A fantastic opportunity to avail of the expertise taught in The Angel Academy, but in a rather cooler climate!

JERED WOZNICKI

Jered Woznicki is a Senior Instructor at the Angel Academy of Art, Florence. Born in Chicago, he graduated from the American Academy of Art in 1994. One of Mr Woznicki’s paintings remains in the permanent collection of the American Academy of Art alongside those of other notable graduates such as Scott Burdick and Richard Schmid. 

Jered Woznicki’s art has won many awards throughout the United States as well as in Italy. In 1999, he was awarded a medal in the prestigious Florence Biennale, an international assembly of over 500 recognized artists. In 2014, his work was collected by MEAM, the European Museum of Modern Art in Barcelona, Spain. Mr Woznicki’s paintings and drawings are to be found in private and public collections in Europe, North America and China. As well as teaching, he works on his own figural and still-life paintings.

Student painting in workshop

Student painting in workshop

Further Workshop Details:
The workshop includes 30 hours tuition, from 10am - 5pm daily with a 1 hour lunch break. Students choose in advance one of the three artworks above to copy in the workshop. 

Individual and group critiques
Painting demonstrations by Mr Woznicki
Discussions on materials and techniques 

COST: £750 to include 30 hours of instruction, and some materials. 

A list of materials (paint and brushes) will be sent upon booking a place.

Terms & Conditions:
A 50% non-refundable deposit is required to hold your place. Full payment must be received by 1st June 2017. 
Minimum number of students - 10.

Not included:
Accommodation and flights, transport and all other personal costs.  

Fees are non refundable unless the course is cancelled for any reason. 
If traveling, it is recommended that you take out insurance to cover costs in the unlikely event of cancellation etc. 

Details of accommodation near the studio will be provided upon booking. 

For booking information and all enquiries please email julie@juliedouglas.co.uk 

Belfast is a vibrant city with a warm friendly atmosphere. If you are traveling for this course, you will find lots of things in the city to enjoy, in the days before or after the workshop. 

https://www.discovernorthernireland.com/belfast/

 

Michael John Angel Masterclass 2017, Belfast

BOUGUEREAU'S METHOD OF PAINTING Friday 18th - Tuesday 22nd August 2017

Option 1, Bouguereau, 'Girl With Pot'

Option 1, Bouguereau, 'Girl With Pot'

Following the success of his visit last summer, I am delighted to welcome Maestro back to Belfast in 2017. He will deliver a five day workshop guiding students through the full process of creating a successful painting in oils. An incredibly generous teacher, the workshop is a wonderful opportunity to benefit from the atelier system, with intensive tuition delivering knowledge gathered from a lifetime of experience. 

Course Description: 
William Bouguereau (1825–1905) is one of the leading lights in the 21st-century revival of Representational painting. To many people today, Bouguereau’s ability to draw and paint seems miraculous, but this ability can, in fact be learned.

In this one-week workshop, maestro Michael John Angel teaches the students how to begin attaining a firm grasp on the methods and techniques of Bouguereau and other 19th-century French Academy painters.

Option 2, Bouguereau, 'Gabrielle Cot'

Option 2, Bouguereau, 'Gabrielle Cot'

The course begins with a few basic exercises and includes various illustrated lectures in proportion, gesture, under-drawing and oil-painting materials. During the five-day course, each student produces an oil painting in full colour, and throughout the workshop Mr Angel gives painting demonstrations that clarify each stage of the painting process.

Option 3, Bouguereau, 'Cupid'

Option 3, Bouguereau, 'Cupid'

Students will also receive various pdf handouts, with illustrations, that encapsulate the methods of painting and drawing in a realistic manner. Other pdf handouts will explain the different grounds, materials and mediums used in oil painting and describe the various layers used in a 19th-century underpainting-overpainting oil technique.


Further Workshop Details:
The workshop includes 30 hours tuition, from 10am - 5pm daily with a 1 hour lunch break. Students choose in advance one of the three artworks above to copy in the workshop. 
Individual and group critiques
Painting demonstrations by Mr Angel
Discussions on materials and techniques
COST: £750 to include 30 hours of instruction, and some materials. 
A list of materials (paint and brushes) will be sent upon booking a place.
 

Michael John Angel, giving a demonstration in Belfast 2016

Michael John Angel, giving a demonstration in Belfast 2016

Mr Angel is highly regarded as one of the foremost figurative painters, and his paintings and portraits hang in both public and private collections worldwide. For the last 20 years, he has been the Director of Studies and senior instructor at the Angel Academy of Art, Florence. 

Pippa painting in Florence.

Pippa painting in Florence.

Mr Angel has taught workshops in Florence, in Toronto and at the American Academy of Art in Chicago. He also lectures at the Florentine campuses of several American universities and at various private schools in Rome and in North America. From 1982 to 1988 he was the Director of the National Portrait Academy in Toronto, Canada, and from 1992 - 1995 the Assistant Director of the Florence Academy of Art in Florence, Italy.  As an ARC living master, Mr Angel is considered one of the most inspiring and successful teachers in classical and traditional art today.

 A short biography can be found at www.angelartschool.com/mja.html. He is listed in the Art Renewal Center’s Living Masters gallery and is one of the ARC’s Board of Judges. As well as judging the ARC’s Annual International Salon, he is a judge on several other national and international painting juries, such as the Collection Beaux-Arts Réaliste, IlluxCon, and the Portrait Society of Canada.

Terms & Conditions:
A 50% non-refundable deposit is required to hold your place. Full payment must be received by 1st June 2017. 
Minimum number of students - 10.

Not included:
Accommodation and flights, transport and all other personal costs.  Fees are non refundable unless the course is cancelled for any reason. 
 If traveling, it is recommended that you take out insurance to cover costs in the unlikely event of cancellation etc. 

Details of accommodation near the studio will be provided upon booking. 

For booking information and all enquiries please email julie@juliedouglas.co.uk 

Belfast is a vibrant city with a warm friendly atmosphere. If you are traveling for this course, you will find lots of things in the city to enjoy, in the days before or after the workshop. 

https://www.discovernorthernireland.com/belfast/

Luck of the Irish? Gerberas, Chrysanths and Daisies: Oil painting on linen.

When I looked back to find the photos of the initial stages of this painting, I was shocked to see that I began working on it 5 months ago. Now, this doesn't mean that I've taken 5 months to compete the painting! No. In fact, it's still not quite finished, but another few hours on the background will do it.  In between bouts at the easel, I have been very busy illustrating and photographing my book, as well as doing lots of teaching.  I am trying to finish the painting in time for the book launch - I love a deadline!

The first pass 

The first pass 

I took the reference photo several years ago, just before Christmas in a florist in Lisburn. It was snowing outside, but the light caught the flowers beautifully. I don't often paint flowers - but it was painting light and colour that I was interested in, and in spite of the complex nature of the subject, I was happy to tackle it. 

This photo shows you the scale of the painting.

This photo shows you the scale of the painting.

I always enjoy the blocking-in stage - it's all to play for, and the true magnitude of the task in hand hasn't quite hit home yet... After toning the background, I did a rough layer of colour over the whole canvas. This should be as close as possible to the final colours and tones, but it acts as a good base for the final colour layer to sit upon.  I worked one flower at a time. 

Blocked in. 

Blocked in. 

I usually do my cropping at the photographing stage, but in this case I altered the composition slightly on the right hand side, removing a chrysanthemum from top right which I felt disrupted the strength of the patterns created by the tallest daisy. 

Putting in the first layer of colour, one flower at a time

Putting in the first layer of colour, one flower at a time

First pass complete

First pass complete

At this point, I went through a phase of getting paint everywhere, including my computer keyboard, which is... not helpful! So I decided to try working with gloves. I wasn't sure if I'd like it - but I do! Just about everything we use for oil painting is toxic to some degree, so it's sensible to protect the hands. 

yuck!

yuck!

I began the second layer by painting one flower at a time once more - when you know are going to have long gaps between visits to the easel, it's great to have small areas to 'complete' as you go along.  The second layer gives a richness to the painitng. Remember, oil paint is transparent, so the more layers, the more 'solid' and secure the painting will be. The background at the top is an ornamental cabbage, which currently looks like draped fabric!

Second layer on the first daisy

Second layer on the first daisy

Daisies on the left show the second layer 

Daisies on the left show the second layer 

gloved up!

gloved up!

a little crysanthemum added at the back.

a little crysanthemum added at the back.

It was somewhere between the photo above and the photo below that my camera stopped functioning. It just couldn't focus - the flower on the right, below,  is blurred.  (In reality, the flower is soft but not as soft as the photo!)  Oh no!!

Frustratingly fuzzy photo!

Frustratingly fuzzy photo!

JulieDouglas12.jpg

Above - the second layer on the flowers is complete. As you can see, the flower at the top is blurred - this, again, is the camera. For the photo below, which is the whole painting complete apart from the top background, I had to use the 'selfie' camera, so the quality isn't good, but hopefully you get the gist. 

The camera I've been using is the one in my iPhone. I consider myself VERY lucky. I used it to take every photograph in my book (over 500 shots printed), and the quality is excellent. The repair shop replaced it with a new camera, hoorah! But sadly, it still doesn't focus, which means, apparently, that it's 'a phone problem'.  I suspect that I've used up my picture allowance.

I've had the phone just 18 months. I think the time has come to buy a little digital camera again, and not rely on the phone for photographs. Gone are the days of repairing our belongings, it seems. But an 18 month life-span isn't long enough for me! This consumer is looking elsewhere... 

Next up: oil painting workshop, Belfast. For info email julie@juliedouglas.co.uk

BOOK LAUNCH and display of student drawings and paintings, Sunday 2nd April, The Engine Room Gallery, Belfast. All welcome!

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Gray Portrait Workshop at Atlier Nadai France

Last week I attended a wonderful oil portrait painting workshop in south-east France at Atelier Nadai, with the amazing artist David Gray (www.davidgrayart.com).

Attending workshops is a great way to practice what we know already, as well as learn how other artists tackle the process of painting. David was generous with his knowledge, kind and funny,  and hardly told us off at all... 

The first day was drawing the face, using the traditional measuring technique, and it took us all day. By the end of the day, after a lot of sighing and groaning (in arty agony), squinting and reworking, we had transferred the image onto the canvas ready for the next day. (David did try to make it clear that in fact, HE was the only one allowed to sigh. SIGH.. By the fourth day, I had resorted to growling in frustration at my painting.) 

                                                                 My drawing, flaws and all

 

David started each day with a long demonstration before letting us loose. On the second day, we began with a colour study in the morning, and then moved on to the underpainting. Trying out a different palette of colours is always interesting, and David used a couple of colours that were new to me - I liked them (which is just as well, as I was going to be using them like it or not!). One new one was Quinacradone Violet. 

Peering at David's demo. On the right is the lovely Kyoko, who managed the studio and kept us in order...

Peering at David's demo. On the right is the lovely Kyoko, who managed the studio and kept us in order...

                                                                 My colour study, top, and the underpainting by end of day 2

                                                                 My colour study, top, and the underpainting by end of day 2

 We were in the studio for long hours, from 8am - 6.30, on average, but it was still a struggle to get everything done. David's hurry-up phrase was, "c'm-ON guys..."

The view from my easel - next to Inge, Laurette, Kristin and Jean-Michel. You can tell that David is a Proper Artist, as he's donned a smock..

The view from my easel - next to Inge, Laurette, Kristin and Jean-Michel. You can tell that David is a Proper Artist, as he's donned a smock..

  I painted the hair in less than an hour, as my taxi was coming to take me to the train station, ah ah aaaaaaah!! But, there's nothing like a deadline to make you focus and slap something down.

                                 My painting by the end of day 4

                                 My painting by the end of day 4

As my painting was still wet, and very unfinished, by the time I had to leave,  I left it in the studio to dry. I look forward to receiving it in the post so that I can do some glazing.
 

The proof of the pudding, of course, is less what is completed during the workshop, and much more about what you actually take home with you to your own studio. I have spent two days painting since I got home, on an artwork that I'd already started. And yes, I am working slightly differently, I am seeing slightly differently and I... like it.  I DO feel the benefit of taking the course and would do it again. But remember, a course like this isn't dreamy - it's hard work and not for sissies. 

Our group of Not Sissies, L-R: Inge, Laurette, me, Nicole, Jean-Michel, Elias, Mirko, Keanu, at the back David Gray, then Kristin, Christophe and Michel Nadai. 

Our group of Not Sissies, L-R: Inge, Laurette, me, Nicole, Jean-Michel, Elias, Mirko, Keanu, at the back David Gray, then Kristin, Christophe and Michel Nadai. 

The students came from all over the place - Norway, Switzerland, South Africa, some from other parts of France, and David had travelled from Seattle. Obviously, we all take it pretty seriously! 

Atelier Nadai is evenly-lit, lovely and airy. Michel Nadai is a master craftsman, of painted murals and trompe-l'oeil (http://www.atelier-nadai.com/en_GB) and Kyoko runs the studio with an air of graceful calm. She also did an amazing job of translating everything David said, into French, as we went along. 

I know, south of France sounds lovely, but in March, the weather was baltic and wet - definitely the lower range of temperatures. But, we were there for the art and to be honest, it was pretty sunny inside the studio. 

For upcoming workshops, in Colour pencil, pastels, drawing, water colour and oils, please email julie@juliedouglas.co.uk 

 

The Draw in Symposium, Belfast, 2014 - an Extraordinary Experience

The last weekend in August 2014 was very special, for many many people. The Draw In Symposium was an incredible two days of open hearted sharing, with artists from many disciplines coming together to share their experiences, to swap stories and ideas, providing a lively, passionate, authentic creative experience for students of all ages and from all backgrounds. The place was buzzing, and everyone who was there was changed in some way.

L-R: Colleen Barry (from the Grand Central Academy, New York), Matt Weigle (also from GCA, NY) Aidan McGrath (architect and photographer, Belfast), Paul Foxton (artist, London), Peter Cooper (animator, Belfast), PJLynch (illustrator, Dublin), Shevaun Doherty (botanical artist, Dublin) and me, wth an L-plate,  introducing everyone to the sessions ahead. 

L-R: Colleen Barry (from the Grand Central Academy, New York), Matt Weigle (also from GCA, NY) Aidan McGrath (architect and photographer, Belfast), Paul Foxton (artist, London), Peter Cooper (animator, Belfast), PJLynch (illustrator, Dublin), Shevaun Doherty (botanical artist, Dublin) and me, wth an L-plate,  introducing everyone to the sessions ahead. 

Me introducing Paul Foxton

Me introducing Paul Foxton

And while, in my teaching, I have regularly witnessed individual students having AHA moments of understanding, watched the great relief some experience in truly understanding something they thought was beyond them, and seen many people joyfully uplifted through their own progress, I have never seen it happen to so many people at once. It was humbling and hard to describe. I think it was the most profound, moving, inspiring and fast moving weekend of my LIFE. Such an incredible experience, so much knowledge shared. Amazing.

But it was so much fun too. Energetic and delicious!

PJ Lynch giving his portrait demonstration. 

Big screen was so helpful behind PJ Lynch. my son modelled for him 

Peter Cooper encouraging students to view his sculptures. 

Believe it or not, Paul Foxton is in the middle of this crowd, doing his demonstration. 

Believe it or not, Paul Foxton is in the middle of this crowd, doing his demonstration. 

Shevaun Doherty, talking us through her wonderful botanic paintings, in the gallery. 

A bit of audience participation, playing with clay during Peter Cooper's demonstration

One of my figure drawing workshops

 On the first day we began with a panel discussion where the artists answered the questions I asked, each of them describing the relevance of Drawing within their own practice. This  gave the audience a glimpse into the practicalities and nitty gritty of creative development. We had demonstrations in Creature Sculpting by Peter Cooper, oil portraiture by PJ Lynch, Studio Practice with Paul Foxton, talks by Colleen Barry and Shevaun Doherty. In between all of this, students peered at the drawings and sketch books and roughs on display in the gallery.

On the second day, PJLynch, Paul Foxton and I gave workshops (in portrait drawing, Studio Practice and Figure Drawing) and this was a marathon for the students AND us! I worked out that over 300 pieces of artwork were generated that day - that's a lot of drawing.

It was an extravaganza. And I look forward to doing it again!

My wonderful volunteers, Pamela, Katy, Rory, Niamh, Liz, Lisa (chief whip) and Judith. I couldn't have done it without them, they were fantastic. 

My wonderful volunteers, Pamela, Katy, Rory, Niamh, Liz, Lisa (chief whip) and Judith. I couldn't have done it without them, they were fantastic. 

PJ Lynch portrait workshop

Here is just some of the lovely feedback I recieved from students:

From G.M. - A really talented and inspiring bunch of people - all gathered by you and infected by your enthusiasm. Well done on it all. The organisation, balance of presentations and goodwill engendered was fantastic.

From R.K - I just wanted to let you know what I thought of the weekend symposium which you organised. My sister and I thoroughly enjoyed every minute and we came home fired up and even more enthusiastic to get cracking to find out if we can do it! I felt as if the whole course was set up for me alone, as you made it all "do-able". I loved the artists, so cleverly selected and I would love to have heard more and more and more about their practice. 

PJ Lynch was so fantastic and I could have stayed with the portraiture all day but then I felt the same about the figure drawing.
Most of all I feel affirmed and a little more confident (something I have spent my life giving others in teaching). I don't know how long that will last but I am determined to give myself a chance now that I have given up teaching.
I loved the course, the tutors, the people, the art of course and the craic. You were a breath of fresh air to listen to and see in action.


From J.F. - Well I absolutely loved the course and was really pleased I got to take part in it. I was there for the weekend only. My highlights were
 

Colleen Barry's talk - I felt privileged to be in the same room as her. 
P.J.s Workshop - Thoroughly enjoyed this and was very happy with my portrait. I'm a member of Illustrator's Ireland, as is PJ and I was feeling trepidation about doing his workshop. I draw cartoon people while he creates masterpieces so I was feeling a bit mortified but he was great and I really learned a lot.
Your workshop and I'm not just saying that :)  I feel like my drawing is very stiff so your workshop was EXACTLY what I need to loosen up and look at things differently - inside edges instead of outlines. 

            So thank you again for the opportunity Julie, I left feeling really inspired.


Paul Foxton made comments about it on his blog here
http://www.learning-to-see.co.uk/belfast-draw-in

Delicious and unique offerings for March, Belfast 2015

After the success of the Draw In Symposium last year, I was asked to create a drawing theme throughout the Ulster Festival of Art & Design, which takes place from 9th - 14th March 2015 in Belfast.
The festival comprises of many lectures, at lunch times and in the evening, from speakers from all aspects of the creative field. I have always been impressed by the quality of the speakers, no matter what their discipline and I was delighted to be asked to contribute.

Here is what I have come up with - all events take place at Belfast School of Art.

On Monday 9th, Tuesday 10th and Friday 13th March" Lunchtime Location Drawing".  I will be holding tutored sessions at 1pm for an hour.

Saturday 14th March, 11 - 1pm,  I will be teaching a tutored Life Drawing session.

Wednesday 11th March,  at 11am - award winning illustrator PJ Lynch will be delivering a talk and oil painting demonstration.

PJ Lynch oils demonstration 

PJ Lynch oils demonstration 

Wednesday 11th March at 6pm - Katherine Tyrrell, artist, author and the UK's number 3 art blogger will be giving a talk about her new book about Drawing.

Thursday 12th March 11am - Drawing Together: a panel of artists including P Lynch, Katherine Tyrrell, set & costume designer David Craig, and Michael John Angel from The Angel Academy in Florence, will each speak about their work and answer questions from the audience and each other. This will be unique and very interesting.

Draw Together - a panel discussing the nuts and bolts of drawing practice. 

Draw Together - a panel discussing the nuts and bolts of drawing practice. 

Thursday 12th March, 6pm - Michael John Angel, founder of The Angel Academy of Art, Florence, will give a lecture entitled 'The Training of the 21st Century Realist Painter'.

Student from The Angel Academy, Florence, with his work

Bookings should be made through the festival website,
http://www.ulsterfestival.com
All sessions are subsidised and very inexpensive.

I hope you will be at as many of these sessions as possible!